Structural asymmetry in a conserved signaling system that regulates division, replication and virulence of an intracellular pathogen.

We have functionally and structurally defined an essential protein phosphorelay that regulates expression… [more]

Structural asymmetry in a conserved signaling system that regulates division, replication and virulence of an intracellular pathogen. Structural asymmetry in a conserved signaling system that regulates division, replication and virulence of an intracellular pathogen.

2016 Functional Genomics Program meeting

The 2016 NIAID Functional Genomics program meeting will be hosted by Harvard University on May 2-4, 2016… [more]

2016 Functional Genomics Program meeting 2016 Functional Genomics Program meeting

The Brucella abortus virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signaling pathway

Summary In the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, the general stress response (GSR) signaling… [more]

The <em>Brucella abortus</em> virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signaling pathway The <em>Brucella abortus</em> virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signaling pathway

YfbA, a Yersinia pestis regulator required for colonization and biofilm formation in the gut of cat fleas.

Tam, C., Demke, O., Hermanas, T., Mitchell, A., Hendrickx, A.P., and Schneewind, O.  2014.  YfbA, a… [more]

YfbA, a <em>Yersinia pestis</em> regulator required for colonization and biofilm formation in the gut of cat fleas. YfbA, a <em>Yersinia pestis</em> regulator required for colonization and biofilm formation in the gut of cat fleas.

The Chicago Center for Functional Annotation (CCFA) is defining gene function on multiple scales, using a multi-disciplinary set of cellular, genetic, molecular, and biochemical approaches. The primary goal of the CCFA is to define the biochemical and cellular functions of uncharacterized genes in the NIAID priority pathogens, Yersinia pestis and Brucella abortus.

Progress of biophysical characterization

News and Events

Read more

Read more

NIAID Functional Genomics Program

The NIAID Functional Genomics Program will generate experimental data that define the biochemical function(s) of hypothetical genes, unknown open reading frames, and noncoding RNAs in infectious disease pathogens. Obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of uncharacterized genes in infectious disease pathogens will lead to improved genomic annotation and allow for the development of potential new targets for medical diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. This program will distribute data, software, and reagents generated from the research projects to the broader scientific community. These research activities are carried out at four sites:
1) Harvard School of Public Health
2) University of Chicago
3) University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
4) University of Washington